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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
stevens and three other u.s. diplomats were killed on tuesday. we're told by the fbi that a full scale investigation has started, but, the reports are they are still having trouble getting their feet on the ground, inside the country. it, of course is also, an insecure situation. but, they do have support on the ground, 50-man-strong team of marine rapid response fighters. off the coast, one u.s. navy destroyer, and, overhead, surveillance drones, too. and in that country, jamie, the libyan government, too, is saying they want to help and there are new reports the past 24 hours, more individuals have been rounded up and seen at the scene of that killing. but, again, questions about how committed and how able they are to help from a lot of people. back to you. >> jamie: as many as 20 countries seeing violence and protests, thanks, greg palkot in tunisia. >> eric: meanwhile, secretary of state hillary clinton has been working the phones this weekend. calling top officials from 7 countries, to discuss the growing demonstrations. can the u.s. and the leaders of those nations stop this cris
-qaeda leader. what do we know? >> we are obviously investigating this very closely. the fbi has a lead in this investigation. the information the best information and the best assessment we have today is that in fact this was not a preplanned premeditated attack. that what happened initially was that it was a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired in cairo as a consequence of the video. people gathered outside the embassy and then it grew very violent and those with extremist ties joined the fray and came with heav heavy weapos which unfortunately are quite common in post revolutionary libya and that then spun out of control. we don't see at this point signs this was a coordinated plan premeditated attack. we will wait for the results of the investigation and don't want to jump to conclusions before then. i think it is important for the american people to know our best current assessment. >> chris: and the last question, terror cells in benghazi have carried out five attacks since april including one at the same consultate, a bombing at the same consultate in june, should u.s
in a vehicle he parked in front of the bar. >> credit is due to the fbi for literally discovering a needle in a hay stack. >> reporter: federal prosecutors say the suspect was under watch of authorities for months after he posted material on the internet relating to violent jihad and the killing of americans. >> they went undercover by pretending to be terrorist colleagues. who could help him in his plans to carry out an attack. >> reporter: authorities say daoud allegedly drafted a list of approximately 29 potential targets including military recruiting centers, bars, malls and other tourist attractions in the chicago area. but at no time, authorities say, did he pose a real threat to the public. prosecutors are expected to outline more details at a hearing tomorrow. meanwhile the suspect remains in custody and he, too, is expected to appear at the hearing. alex? >> all right, michelle franzen, many thanks. >>> heading overseas. more dramatic turns on a number of fronts. first to afghanistan. four americans are dead after another so-called insider attack. a member of the afghan security f
an fbi agent, i get to look at all of that. i come to a different conclusion. they are only moderately confident that it was a spontaneous event because there are huge gaps in what we know. >> shannon: it was all about u.s. foreign policy on fox news sunday. i sat down with chris wallace for more on his interviews with dr. susan rice and the house intelligence chair, mike rogers. chris, it is all about what happened in foreign pm's this week. you had the ambassador to the u.n., dr. susan rice, to talk about the administration's position on what may have sparked what we saw play out in the middle-east. >> it is intk because jay carney, the white house spokesman said it on friday and ambassador rice backed it up, reinforced it, doubled down on sunday. they say that all of this unrest across the middle-east is all about that video that came out, this obscure video that insults the prophet muhammad, they say it has nothing to do with anti-american feelings and u.s. policies. there are an awful lot of people who question that, but that's the position of the administration. >> shannon: you t
. teachers are being told to return to work tomorrow to prepare their classrooms. >>> also in chicago, fbi agents stop an alleged terror attack in the windy city. 18-year-old adele darud was arrested after he tried to detonate what he thought was a car bomb outside a downtown chicago bar. it was part of an undercover operation where agents pretended to be terrorists and gave him a fake car bomb. the feds say they have been monitoring darud since may after he posted material online in may about killing americans. >>> first a french magazine, now a newspaper in ireland is publishing topless photos of the dutches of cambridge. they were taken when princess kate and prince william were sunbathing in france. despite the threat of legal action, a newspaper in italy is also publishing the pictures. >>> around the world, targeting americans continue. while there have been dozens of demonstrators -- why this is all happening, coming up next.  . >>> we continue to follow the protests against the united states in the wake of that antimuslim film. take a look at this ma
's an fbi investigation that's ongoing and we look to that investigation to give us the definitive word as to what transpired. but putting together the best information that we have available to us today, our current assessment is that what happened in benghazi was, in fact, initially a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired hours before in cairo, almost a copycat of the demonstrations against our facility in cairo, which were prompted, of course, by the video. what we think then transpired in benghazi is that opportunistic extremist elements came to the consulate as this was unfolding. they came with heavy weapons, which unfortunately, are readily available in postrevolutionary libya. and it escalated into a much more violent episode. obviously, that's our best judgment now. we'll await the results of the investigation, and the president has been very clear we'll work with the libyan authorities to bring those responsible to justice. >> was there a failure here that this administration is responsible for, whether it's an intelligence failure, a failure to see this coming, or
to know that there's an fbi investigation that has begun and it will take some time to be completed. that will tell us with certainty what transpired. but our current assessment, is that in fact what began as a spontaneous not a premeditated response to what had transpired in cairo, there was a violent protest that was undertaken in reaction to this video that was disseminated. we believe that folks in benghazi, a small number of people came to the consulate to replicate this sort of challenge that was posed in cairo and then as that unfolded, it seems to have been hijacked, let us say, by some individual clusters of extremists that came with heavier weapons, weapons as you know that, in the wake of the revolution in libya, are quite common and accessible. then it evolved from there. we'll wait to see exactly what the investigation finally confirms. but that's the best information that we have at present. >> why was there such a security breakdown, why wasn't there better security at the compound in benghazi? why weren't there u.s. marines in tripoli? >> first of all, we had substan
happened in benghazi, the fbi can't get within 400 miles there to examine the evidence which is already being destroyed, so it's going to be hard to make a case. what about this letter that you have sent asking for answers about what went wrong in benghazi? >> well i have the letter here with me. i could show it to you. i wouldn't change anything. let me be crystal clear as chairman of that committee, and i hope this gets out to other people who are listening about this. >> and i should point out i've got the letter here too. we've gone through it. >> republicans are working overtime to try to exploit a very normal, run of the course, admin strative letter that we agreed to on a bipartisan basis in our committee, simply to get some additional questions put in front of the state department that are part of their already existing investigation. this is not a challenge. it is nothing new. it is not something out of the ordinary. and i agreed to do it as a matter of bipartisanship because we thought these were important questions that people ought to be examining. >> but aren't you concerne
in benghazi? and to that, the fbi says it is too dangerous to be in benghazi why none of them are there now. is that because the situation has worsened or was the always that dangerous in benghazi? >> i think, on the terrorist attack i mean, as we determined the details of what took place there, and how that, attack took place, that it became clear that there were terrorists who had planned that attack and that's when i came to that conclusion. as again, as to who was involved, what specific groups were involved, i think the investigation that is ongoing hopefully will determine that. >> a day after or, was -- >> took a while to really get some of the feedback from what exactly happened at that location. >> there was a thread of intelligence reporting that that groups in the environment in western, correction, eastern libya were seeking to coalesce but there wasn't anything specific and certainly not a specific threat to the consulate that i'm aware of. and, as far as to the risks that the fbi reported to you, really have to ask them for why they made that determination. i don't know. >> wa
task force to include more federal partners, including the fbi, the intelligence community is devoting more resources to identify networks, which have strengthen protections so workers know their rights. most of all we are going after the traffickers. eams nti-trafficking t are dismantling their networks. we're putting them where they belong, behind bars. but with more than 20 million victims around the world, more than 20 million, we have a lot more to do. that is why this year i directed my administration to increase efforts, and today i can announce a series of that additional steps we will take. we will do more to spot it and stop it. we will prepare a new assessment of human trafficking in united states so we understand the scope and scale of the problem. we will strengthen training so investigators and law enforcement are better equipped to take action. and treat victims as victims, not as criminals. we will work with amtrak and bus and truck inspectors so they are on the look out. we will help educators spot the signs as well and bettors turf -- better serve those who are vulner
as criminals and the president first called in the fbi to deal with the challenge as if it was a criminal matter >> the question before i turn out to you guys is what have -- what would have been wrong with the president coming to the rose garden and saying i am horrified by what has happened in egypt and obviously horrified by what has been done in libya. the safety and security is my foremost responsibility. but i would like to stand here and remind the people of egypt and the president and the prime minister and acting prime minister of libya that american lives were laid on the line for you on the one side, and we supported your efforts on the other side. we stand with countries that stand with the rule of law and you need to understand that you need to do the same for us. thank you very much to the time we'd be looking into this and walk away. rather than the sort of, you know, excuse making about islam. would that have been wrong for the president to do that? >> actions speak louder than words. they are also sending the military. you can disagree the fact there was in the military a
, high-ranking member of the f.b.i., director of national intelligence, general clapper and the vice chairman of the joint chiefs of staff to tell us ostensibly what happened in the tragic death of christopher -- ambassador christopher stevens and three other brave americans. so we gathered down in the secret room, which everybody turns in their phones and blackberries, and we went in and listened to basically a description of america's military disposition in that part of the world, something which certainly does not warrant a super secret briefing. but more importantly than that, when the secretary and the others were asked exactly what happened, what happened here, what caused this tragedy? what was the sequence of events? in fact, it was senators, the ranking member of the intelligence committee, what happened? the answer was, well, that's still an ongoing investigation, and we can't tell you anything. we were supposed to be down there to hear what happened, to hear the administration's version of events of what happened. we were told nothing. we were told absolutely nothing. and
in washington, chief of staff to the fbi director robert meueller and he began the justice department lawyer to fill the position as the attorney general for national security he then served as the homeland security adviser to president george w. bush and is now in private practice in washington. ken, please. spec the panel starts off with a reference to playboy magazine, but i will see if i can catch my breath and go forward. thanks very much, pete. good to be here. i've been asked to talk about three cases. 1i guess you could call a national security case and then number to a more regular case. let me start with the national security case and that is called blabber versus amnesty international. it's actually standing case but it's a standing case relating to a challenge to what's called the fisa amendment act passed in 2008, and was an amendment through a very substantial amount of the foreign intelligence surveillance act passed in 1978, and to understand the standing issue of the stakes at play you have to understand the merits a little bit so let me get into them. >> for those watching
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)